Friday, February 22, 2013

Adopt a Rescued Rabbit This February


February is "Adopt a Rescued Rabbit Month" which is perfect timing for the upcoming bunny-themed holiday of Easter. Many parents purchase pet rabbits for their children during the spring and for Easter. Rabbits do make wonderful pets, but don't believe that they are an "easy" pet to care for. They are no easier to care for than a cat or dog.

Here are some pet rabbit facts that many people aren't aware of - even after they have already taken on a rabbit as a pet.


  • A rabbit's teeth never stop growing! They need plenty of hay and things to chew on to grind down their teeth. Here's some more information about the importance of hay in a rabbit's diet
  • Rabbits will thump a back paw when they are unhappy, angry, or scared of something as a warning. 
  • It's normal for rabbits to poop a lot - it's their job! It's even normal for them to eat their feces sometimes. That's called coprophagia
  • Rabbits do not have pads on their feet like a cat or dog. The fur on the bottom of their feet is very important for keeping their feet protected and should not be completely shaved or trimmed away.
  • Some rabbits are trained to do agility courses. Rabbits can be clicker trained like many other pets. 
  • A rabbit can potentially break it's back while being held if they kick their back legs out. That's why it's important to hold and carry them properly. 
  • Rabbits like to eat greens! Dark leafy greens like dandelion greens, collared greens, cilantro, parsley, mustard greens and more are great for rabbits to eat. Unfortunately, things like romaine or iceberg lettuce have no real nutritional value to bunnies.

Instead of buying a rabbit from a pet store, why not support pet adoption by rescuing a bunny in need? There are plenty of rabbits out there looking for forever homes. Before adopting a pet rabbit, be sure to do your research and know exactly what you are getting into. One of my favorite places to go for good rabbit care information is the House Rabbit Society.

Remember that rabbits make great pets, but children should always be supervised with them. A child cannot take care of a rabbit on their own and a lot of help from adults will be needed. The ASPCA does not recommend children under the age of 10 care for pets. Children older than 10 should still be supervised and assisted when caring for pets.

19 comments:

  1. Hehehe we brought Speedy home feb 3rd last year didn't realize that about feb

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    1. How cool that he gets to be a February bunny!

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  2. We did not know it was adopt a rabbit time. Clever just in time for Easter. Have a fabulous Friday.
    Best wishes Molly

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  3. We hope all the bunnies who need homes find good ones. Lee and Phod whose Man use to raise rabbits

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  4. My sister and I each had a rabbit when we were little. They were very sweet.

    I never knew that they thump a hind leg when they are fearful or angry. Thank you for always teaching me something new; that's what I love about this blog!! :)

    Keep up the fantastic work!

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    1. Thank you so much guys! I appreciate it :)

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  5. I would love to have some rabbits but there just isn't room here for any more animals. My neighbor had about 40 or more rabbits and then got sick of taking care of them and turned them all loose. They lasted for a little while but not long. They are not smart about where they have their babies. Great post. I did not know about them being able to break their backs from being picked up wrong. Take care.

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  6. That's really nice. We used to have a rabbit a while back but won't be able to get another one anytime soon. This little piggy is keeping me too busy!

    Oink oink,
    Katie and Coccolino the mini pig

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  7. I'd love a Wabbit but the Blonde would think it was a furry toy..LOL xx00xx

    Mollie and Alfie

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  8. The rabbit on the pic is so cute. I'm not sure it would be a good idea in a family with three cats though ;-)
    Purrs

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  9. I hope all of the homeless bunnies can hop in to forever homes really soon.

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  10. Great post! Wow I didn't know that rabbits didn't have pads on their feet!

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  11. this bee a grate post N veree inn form a tive...we trooly dinna noe bout rabbitz teeth... wunder if thatz why bugs bunny bee eatin carrotz all de time ??!!! hay, haza grate week oh end everee one !

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  12. Woof! Woof! We have a friend you have a bunny. One need to be conscious adopting a bunny and be responsible so less bunnies needing their forever home. Lots of Golden Woofs, Sugar

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  13. Thank you for sharing this info! Our Mom wishes she knew half this stuff when she was little and had a rabbit all too briefly. Purring for homeless bunnies to find their forever bunny homes soon! Purrs...

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  14. Thanks for sharing the pictures. I have three pair of rabbits with three months kid. And thanks again for the idea of rabbit day!

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  15. Great information for potential bunny parents.

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  16. I had rabbits as a child and really enjoyed them. We even had wild rabbits have babies and leave em so I adopted all the wildlings, only to my saddness, they died :(. The one thing I couldn't stand was all the poop! :)

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